Jose Nazario

Jose Nazario

Senior Security Researcher, Arbor Networks
Joined on April 23, 2008
Total Post Views: 18,964

About

Dr. Jose Nazario is a Senior Security Researcher with Arbor Networks. In this capacity, he is responsible for analyzing burgeoning Internet security threats, reverse engineering malicious code, software development, developing security mechanisms that are then distributed to Arbor’s Peakflow platforms via the Active Threat Feed (ATF) threat detection service.

Dr. Nazario’s research interests include large-scale Internet trends such as reachability and topology measurement, Internet-scale events such as DDoS attacks, botnets and worms, source code analysis tools, and data mining. He is the author of the books “Defense and Detection Strategies against Internet Worms” and “Secure Architectures with OpenBSD.” He earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Case Western Reserve University in 2002. Prior to joining Arbor Networks, he was an independent security consultant. Dr. Nazario regularly speaks at conferences worldwide, with past presentations at CanSecWest, PacSec, Blackhat, and NANOG. He also maintains WormBlog.com, a site devoted to studying worm detection and defense research.

Except where otherwise noted, all postings by Jose Nazario on CircleID are licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Featured Blogs

Peering into Fast Flux Botnet Activity

Together with Thorsten Holz, I recently published a paper on fast flux botnet behaviors, "As the Net Churns: Fast-Flux Botnet Observations," based on data we gathered in our ATLAS platform. Fast flux service networks utilize botnets to distribute the web servers to the infected PCs... One of the most well known fast flux botnets has been the Storm Worm botnet, which uses the zombies to spam, send out new enticements to infect users, and to host the malicious website which delivers the malcode. more

CNN.Com, Politically Motivated DDoS, and Asymmetric Warfare

Once again I find myself thinking about the nature of the asymmetric warfare threat posed by politically motivated DDoS (Estonia in 07, Korea in 02, and now China vs. CNN in 08). I keep thinking about it in terms of asymmetric warfare, a class of warfare where one side is a traditional, centrally managed military with superior uniformed numbers, weaponry, and skill. On the other we have smaller numbers, usually untrained fighters with meager weapons, and usually a smaller force. Historical examples include the North Vietnamese in the 20th century and even the American Revolution in the 18th century. Clearly this can be an effective strategy for a band of irregulars... more

Topic Interests

CybersecurityCyberattackCybercrimeMalwareDDoS AttackThreat IntelligenceSpamICANN

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Popular Posts

Peering into Fast Flux Botnet Activity

CNN.Com, Politically Motivated DDoS, and Asymmetric Warfare