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Competing Against Big Cable Companies

I’m asked at least twenty times a year how a small ISP can compete against the big cable companies. The question comes from several sources—a newly-formed ISP that is nervous about competing against a giant company, a rural ISP that is entering a larger market to compete, or investors thinking of funding a new ISP. These folks are rightfully nervous about competing against the big cable companies. Comcast and Charter together have roughly 55% of all broadband customers in the country, so the assumption is that they are formidable competitors.

It’s more realistic to say that they are decent competitors. They have slick marketing materials to try to lure customers. They have persuasive online marketing campaigns to snag the attention of new customers. They have good win-back programs to try to keep customers from leaving them.

But the two big cable companies have one obvious weakness—their prices are significantly higher than everybody else in their markets. Every marketing push by these companies involves giving temporary low special prices to lure customers—but those prices eventually revert to much higher list prices.

There is a great example of this in the market today. Both Verizon and T-Mobile have been adding large numbers of broadband customers to their fixed wireless FWA products that deliver home broadband using cellular spectrum. The two cellular companies have been highly successful in the marketplace, adding over 2.6 million new broadband customers through the first three quarters of 2022, while Comcast and Charter added about half a million customers during that same time period—mostly at the start of the year.

The FWA wireless product is clearly competing on price. The FWA broadband is not as fast or robust as cable company broadband, but the prices are attractive to a lot of consumers. For example, T-Mobile offers 100 Mbps broadband for a $50 monthly fee for customers willing to use autopay—a price T-Mobile says will never increase. This is far below the prices of cable companies, which are in the range of $90 per month for standalone broadband.

I thought I’d take a look at how Comcast is competing against the lower-price FWA products. Comcast has two special offers in January 2023 for standalone broadband.

  • In a special offer that ends February 1, Comcast will provide 400 Mbps broadband for $30 per month, which requires autopay. The special price is under a contract for one year, but the special price extends for two years (meaning that if a customer terminates during the first year they have to pay for the remaining months of the contract). The special price for this product was higher in the past and likely has been lowered to compete against FWA.
  • The other offer is ongoing and doesn’t end on February 1. Comcast will provide 800 Mbps download speeds for $60 per month, which requires autopay. This is also a two-year term, with the first year under a contract.

Comcast then adds hidden fees to the special price. Unless a customer brings their own modem, Comcast charges $15 per month for a WiFi modem, a price that was increased by $1 this month. In many markets, Comcast also has data caps, and customers that exceed 1.2 terabytes of usage per month are charged $10 for each additional 50 gigabytes of data used in a month.

For the 400 Mbps product, a customer who brings a modem and who doesn’t exceed the data caps will pay $30 per month if using a bank debit and $35 per month with a credit card debit. Using the Comcast WiFi modem (which most customers do), raises the monthly price to $45 or $50—right in line with the T-Mobile FWA product. But the kicker comes at the end of the term when the price, before a cable modem, jumps to $92 per month and $107 with the modem. The result at the end of the 800 Mbps special is similar, with the price rising to $97 per month before a WiFi modem. Anybody buying the special today must also worry about whatever rate increases Comcast adds to the base broadband price by 2025.

The special prices offered by the big cable companies are alluring—customers can get a significant discount for a year or two. But inevitably, the prices will skyrocket—and in the case of the 400 Mbps special, will more than double at the end of the discounted special.

ISPs that compete against the big cable companies have learned that all they have to do to compete is to offer fair prices and wait out the specials. Over time, customers who get tired of the pricing yoyo will come around. ISPs with fiber tell me that customers that come to them from a cable company almost never go back to cable. Customers appreciate fair pricing with no games and a reliable broadband product that delivers the promised speeds—that’s how you compete against the big ISPs.

By Doug Dawson, President at CCG Consulting

Dawson has worked in the telecom industry since 1978 and has both a consulting and operational background. He and CCG specialize in helping clients launch new broadband markets, develop new products, and finance new ventures.

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