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Networks / Featured Blogs

New Innovations in Free Space Optics

I read an article on the Finley Engineering blog that talks about new research with free-space optics. For those not familiar with the term, this means communication gear that communicates directly using light without any wires. The article talks about a Chinese team of scientists who have used light to transmit ultrahigh-definition video signals between high-rise buildings. more

The Risk Factors of CDNs and Centrality

On the afternoon of June 17 of this year, there was a widespread outage of online services. In Australia, it impacted three of the country's largest banks, the national postal service, the country's reserve bank, and one airline operator. Further afield from Australia, the outage impacted the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and some US airlines. The roll call of affected services appeared to reach some 500 serv more

Deadline of July 2 to Nominate People for Jonathan B. Postel Service Award

Do you know of someone who has made the Internet better in some way who deserves more recognition? Maybe someone who has helped extend Internet access to a large region? Or wrote widely-used programs that make the Internet more secure? Or served in some capacity behind the scenes in Internet services? Or maybe someone who has been actively working for open standards and open processes for the Internet? more

New Hair-Like Plastic Polymer Cable Can Transmit Data Ten Times Faster Than Copper

Scientists and engineers are always looking for ways to speed up and more efficiently configure computing devices to maximize data flow. There are a lot of applications today that require the exchange of huge volumes of data in real-time. MIT scientists have created a hair-like plastic polymer cable that can transmit data ten times faster than copper USB cables. more

Some Thoughts on the Recent DNS Operations, Analysis, and Research Centre Workshop, OARC-35

The DNS Operations, Analysis, and Research Centre (DNS-OARC) convened OARC-35 at the start of May. Here are some thoughts on a few presentations at that meeting that caught my attention... These days it seems that the term "the digital economy" is synonymous with "the surveillance economy." Many providers of services on the Internet spend a lot of time and effort assembling profiles of their customers. These days, it's not just data in terms of large-scale demographics but the assembling of large sets of individual profiles.  more

“It’s Always DNS!” Why DNS Is the Biggest Single Point of Failure in the New Norm

Many in the network security field may be familiar with the phrase: "It's always DNS."  This is a popular meme within the industry, often making reference to the internal domain name system (DNS), the dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP) part of a company's online network, that whenever there is a network issue, it's always an issue with DNS. more

Transport vs. Network

One of the basic tools in network design is the so-called "stacked" protocol model. This model was developed in the late 1970s as part of a broader effort to develop general standards and methods of networking. In 1983, the efforts of the CCITT and ISO were merged to form The Basic Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnection, usually referred to as the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model or the "OSI model." more

Still Waiting for IPv6

It's now been a decade since the world officially ran out of blocks of IP addresses. In early 2011 the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) announced that it had allocated the last block of IPv4 addresses and warned ISPs to start using the new IPv6 addresses. But here we are a decade later and not one of my clients has converted to IPv6. more

Connectivity Starts at Home

Today's Internet is just one application of the powerful idea of best-efforts connectivity. The home router (NAT) decouples the connectivity within the home from the larger internet, enabling innovation that leverages the Internet without being limited by it. Connectivity starts at home. Your computers and devices all interconnect locally. In a sense, the larger Internet is just one more connected device. You are free to innovate and experiment without asking a provider's permission. more

The Insecurity of Ambiguous Standards

Why are networks so insecure? One reason is we don't take network security seriously. We just don't think of the network as a serious target of attack. Or we think of security as a problem "over there," something that exists in the application realm, that needs to be solved by application developers. Or we think the consequences of a network security breach as "well, they can DDoS us, and then we can figure out how to move load around, so if we build with resilience (enough redundancy)... more

Industry Updates

DNS Record Contents: Are Organizations Giving Away More Than They Should?

As Global Internet Demands Skyrocket, Expert Share Advice on How to Optimize IT Infrastructure to Meet Modern-Day Challenges

IP Monetization: IP Leasing Makes the Case for Recurring Long-Term Revenue

Leasing IPv4 Addresses in the Dawn of the New Internet Era

How to Monitor IP Netblocks for Possible Targeted Attacks

Not All VPN Users Are Worth Trusting, a Lesson for Cloud Service Providers

Everything You Need to Know About IPv4 vs. IPv6

The Louisiana State Ransomware Attack: Enhancing Cyberdefense with Reverse IP Address Lookup

The Disney+ Account Hijacking: Preventing Unauthorized Network Access with Threat Intelligence Tools

InterMed Breach: How Threat Intelligence Sources Help Maintain Domain Integrity

Alleviating the Constant Clash Between DevSecOps and DevOps Teams

Moving from the Castle-and-Moat to the Zero-Trust Model

NS1 Raises $33M for Its Application Traffic Management Solutions

How Threat Intelligence Can Solve 3 Common SIEM Problems

Currents of Change: Empowering the Growth and Interplay of Subsea and Interconnection